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Raised by monkeys race car (Oz) was Uncle Jake's (NZ)
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Thread: Raised by monkeys race car (Oz) was Uncle Jake's (NZ)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Wellington, New Zealand
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    Raised by monkeys race car (Oz) was Uncle Jake's (NZ)

    Here we have a 12 year labour of love and loathing.

    I am onto the third re-build now but a bit like the Woodman's axe there isn't much on the car that came with the original racer(TBH I don't think there is anything on the car that was there when I bought it in 1998 except the gearbox cross-member) but she has been a documented race car since 1989

    DSC00718..JPG

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    Carbs%20no%20flas&#10.jpg

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    This is an old photo taken after the second rebuild but before the third rebuild started
    Cortina1..jpg


    Engine
    Pace Products five port dry sump pump
    Mocal remote filter with oil temp port
    Petersen(?) scavange filters
    Seven litre dry sump tank
    All fittings are Earls alloy ones with stainless braided hose

    Light weight steel crank with conversion to lip crank seal (ex. L16)
    New custom made extra long forged rods (Argo Race and set up for standard bearing sizes)
    New custom made forged pistons with total seal rings (83mm - a deliberate choice to aid in relaibility)
    New Manly stainless steel valves
    New competition valve springs and collets
    New high ratio roller rockers and roller rocker shaft
    New custom camshaft matched to head port flow statistics and gear ratios
    New double row timing chain and adjustable sprockets
    Semi down-port head
    22,000psi ARP studded bottom end and head

    We tested tweleve or thirteen blocks then chose this one (2731), fitted it with 1600cc main caps then it was decked, bored and both the crank and cam tunnels were line honed

    Weber 45mm carbs and linakges with lots, and lots of spare jets, venturis etc.

    NOTE: The longblock is assembled but has no manifolds. To get the most out of this engine you will need custom manifolds but I can supply the aftermarket manifolds I was using.


    Driveline
    New custom made steel flywheel
    New Quartermaster 5.5 inch clutch
    New Tilton centre push hydraulic self returning release bearing assembly and remote bleeder
    Corsair style three rail gearbox with Heavy Duty Quaife close ratio gearset (freshly re-built but I make no guarantees on this box being perfect as I have not used it)
    New alloy bellhousing
    A selection of diff ratios

    Chassis, Brakes and Suspension
    Large alloy radiator (new and a US brand but i forget which one)

    Flared guards front and rear
    Super lighweight 13x7 Panasport competition wheels (x5 and never used)
    Near new Khumo race tyres

    Ultra Lightweight stainless race muffler (Coast Fabrication, California)
    Stainless thin wall secondary pipe (unformed)
    Through cabin exhaust tunnel (the remaining exhaust system still needs to be completed)

    Uprated and lightend rear drum brakes with new shoes
    Ulralight two pot alloy front callipers with Mintex pads (new)
    Alloy front hubs (new)
    Alloy wheel nuts (new) and new metric wheel studs
    Braided stainless brake lines through-out
    Willwood pedal box with new M/Cs and remote reseviours

    Koni adjustable shocks all round
    Eiabarch competition front springs (450lbs - new)
    Adjustable camber plates - new
    Custom made 24mm swaybar
    Watts linkage rear

    New Racetech 4000 seat and alloy mounts

    Custom made ridiculously light bonnet, boot and doors (fibreglass).
    All bonnet and boot pins a genuine alloy Sparco units
    Fiberglass bumpers (painted but never fitted)
    MSNZ homologated rollcage (but this is a fairly basic cage and could be improved)


    Ignition and electrics
    Minature Nipondenso alternator (underdriven)
    Electric water pump (Davies Craig) with adjustable thermostatic override switch
    Oddessy 680 CCA battery (weighs about half what a conventional battery weighs)
    Cabin mounted four way accelerometer and software for your laptop (never used)
    Fully removeable (unplugable) wiring harness
    Heated screen
    LED rain light
    MSD 6AL
    MSD timing computer (fixed curve)
    Adjustable MSD retard control (dash mounted)
    MSD coil
    Electronic distributor (fixed - i.e. no mechanical advance)
    10mm Topgun ignition leads
    Reduction geared starter motor (Roadrunner)
    Carter fuel pump
    Jazz (?) fuel cell - 31 litres I think
    Holley fuel pressure regulator
    All gauges are genuine Autometer except the fluid filled fuel pressure gauge which is a Summit


    Trailer (which will also fit a Ford Escort) with winch, straps, LED lights etc.




    I raced it for a few years then rebuilt it in 2002. I raced it for a couple if years after that an it was fast, but not fast enough so I started again with the view of making it light. EVERYTHING that could be lightened has been. This has cost a fortune but I have lost interest in racing ansd the car has sat semi finished for about a year.

    I have calculated the finished car to be about 745kgs dry. I have gone to quite a bit of effort (within the Pre65 rules) to make the unsprung weight as low as possible too.

    All these bits have been designed to work together and are all connected by the flash wiring loom. The entire car is designed to come apart easily and fast (e.g. dash out in less than 17 minutes) so I would really like to keep it all together. I will resist parting out for now.

    Some assembly still required. 60 to 80 hours of effort would get this car completed (plus manifolds and tuning).

    Missing: The car needs door glazing but to be honest would benifit from all glazing being replaced. It deserves custom manifolds and needs the signwriting stripes done on the new bonnet, boot and doors and a new harness. I can't think of anything else that needs to be purchased (apart from fluids and filters) but there is a few hours to spend doing things like fitting the bumpers, shortening the bonnet pins and dyno tuning the engine to perfection

    Price: I want NZD$25,000 for the car as it is (which is about what I have spent on the engine alone). I will assist in transport arrangements but the cost of the transport is your concern (I am told it is about $AUD$2.5k). It may be cheaper to ship without the trailer
    Last edited by UncleJake; 13th April 2010 at 02:31 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Wellington, New Zealand
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    Last night I dragged out a few bits that need to go back onto the car to get it rolling.

    In my never ending quest for weight reduction I bought these red Eiabach springs last year and some new camber plates. The reduction in unsprung weight is significant. the blue springs are the old ones (400lbs) and the red springs the new ones (450lbs).

    I will hopefully fit them over the next ten days.

    DSC02021..jpg

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    DSC01400..jpg
    Last edited by UncleJake; 14th April 2010 at 12:06 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Wellington, New Zealand
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    Quote Originally Posted by raised by monkeys View Post
    hey UJ could you explain the differences from a down port to a semi down port head to me?

    It is a little hard without drawing a diagram but the advantage of a downport is to reduce the short turn radius on the floor of the intake ports. Imagine the port entry run (the first bit of the inlet port) as a horizontal plane, with the inlet manifold on the horizontal too.

    After exiting the carburetor and manifold the charge runs horizontally into the port opening and then turns 90 degrees to pass vertically trough the valve and into the combustion chamber. The turn is quite tight and the short turn radius (the port floor where it turns 90 degrees to meet the valve) is an area of turbulence - a little bit like half kinking your garden hose.

    We want to get rid of the bottom half of that kink in your garden hose.

    A true downport head has the charge going in as straight a line as possible to the valve head. A true downport head has the charge going into the combustion chamber at something like a 35 degree angle. The carbs and intake manifiold would be on the same or slightly reduced angle.

    The problem with a true downport head on a pre-crossflow Cortina is that you need to drill four bloody great holes through the cast iron of the head and then with an interference fit force in some kind of tube (spun cast iron) to form the new ports. This machining will breach the water jacket and although you can get it to seal well for the first few race meetings eventually the different rate of expansion between the original cast iron head and the sleeved tubes you have installed will introduce a water leak. The water will go into the combustion chamber and will cause issues - perhaps as bad as a bent rod due to water hyrdualic compression.


    The other alternative to reducing the short turn radius (and getting a better shot at the valve head) is to lower the valves down into the combustion chamber and re-cut the inlet ports to reduce the tight corner on the floor of the port just before it reaches the valve.

    This is a diffuclt operation on a 47 year old sand cast head due to impurities and carbon soaked into the parent metal but it is done by welding the combustion chamber ceiling up and effectively lowering that ceiling, re-cutting valve sets, re cutting the inlet ports by hand and then fitting longer valves. Pistons must be custom made to allow for the change in C/R and will probably need pockets cut into the piston crown for valve clearance.

    I call this a semi downport. It isn't quite as powerful as a true downport but it should last a lot longer.

    If you make your ports too big then you will lose torque and mid range power. Make them too small and you lose top end power.

    To get the best out of this semi-downport arrangement you would want to fabricate an inlet manifold that matches the flow of the new port geometry to bring the thing alive. You can't buy a manifold like that so we were going to make one.

    Make sense?

    Last edited by UncleJake; 21st April 2010 at 01:23 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    middle northern Melbourne
    Posts
    2,535
    Port_modificatio&#11.gif So basically less like the yellow and more like the blue.
    www.cortina-mk1.com
    Contact me for parts.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2010
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    Wellington, New Zealand
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    ^ If you weren't so ugly I would give you a hug

  6. #6
    Swampy Guest
    Heres a pic of the head I have been working on. Full downdraught as yet untried.

    P1010001.jpg

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    That's the stuff Swampy!

    Have you driven in a cast sleeve or did you build it up with weld?

    I assume there is more clearance for the head studs/bolts than is apparent in the photo

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by UncleJake View Post
    It is a little hard without drawing a diagram but the advantage of a downport is to reduce the short turn radius on the floor of the intake ports. Imagine the port entry run (the first bit of the inlet port) as a horizontal plane, with the inlet manifold on the horizontal too.

    After exiting the carburetor and manifold the charge runs horizontally into the port opening and then turns 90 degrees to pass vertically trough the valve and into the combustion chamber. The turn is quite tight and the short turn radius (the port floor where it turns 90 degrees to meet the valve) is an area of turbulence - a little bit like half kinking your garden hose.

    We want to get rid of the bottom half of that kink in your garden hose.

    A true downport head has the charge going in as straight a line as possible to the valve head. A true downport head has the charge going into the combustion chamber at something like a 35 degree angle. The carbs and intake manifiold would be on the same or slightly reduced angle.

    The problem with a true downport head on a pre-crossflow Cortina is that you need to drill four bloody great holes through the cast iron of the head and then with an interference fit force in some kind of tube (spun cast iron) to form the new ports. This machining will breach the water jacket and although you can get it to seal well for the first few race meetings eventually the different rate of expansion between the original cast iron head and the sleeved tubes you have installed will introduce a water leak. The water will go into the combustion chamber and will cause issues - perhaps as bad as a bent rod due to water hyrdualic compression.


    The other alternative to reducing the short turn radius (and getting a better shot at the valve head) is to lower the valves down into the combustion chamber and re-cut the inlet ports to reduce the tight corner on the floor of the port just before it reaches the valve.

    This is a diffuclt operation on a 47 year old sand cast head due to impurities and carbon soaked into the parent metal but it is done by welding the combustion chamber ceiling up and effectively lowering that ceiling, re-cutting valve sets, re cutting the inlet ports by hand and then fitting longer valves. Pistons must be custom made to allow for the change in C/R and will probably need pockets cut into the piston crown for valve clearance.

    I call this a semi downport. It isn't quite as powerful as a true downport but it should last a lot longer.

    If you make your ports too big then you will lose torque and mid range power. Make them too small and you lose top end power.

    To get the best out of this semi-downport arrangement you would want to fabricate an inlet manifold that matches the flow of the new port geometry to bring the thing alive. You can't buy a manifold like that so we were going to make one.

    Make sense?

    Yes sure does, either configuration requires a fair bit of thought and skill.

    The inlet manifold could be made from alloy or mild steel? It would be relatively easy to cut the mounting flanges from an alloy one and manufacture new runners.

    Extractors could be made from mild and hpc coated or possible exhaust wrap. did your engine guy have a primary size in mind? 4 into 1's or 4, 2, 1 ? im assuming tuned length primarys?

    what about the rest of the exhaust, what size inlet and outlets does that flash muffler run?
    Last edited by raised by monkeys; 21st April 2010 at 11:57 PM.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Swampy View Post
    Heres a pic of the head I have been working on. Full downdraught as yet untried.

    P1010001.jpg
    I like the rocker cover. You sure drink alot of formula swampy, lol

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Posts
    82
    Kris, your questions all make heaps of sense but I only got back from the shed about an hour ago and would like to talk to the engine builder before I answer (it is after 2am here so I cant ring him without fear of hatred).

    We do have the exhaust pipe sizes calculated and it was a 4 to 2 to 1 arrangement but if possible I would like to get you facts rather than what I recall. I will talk with him and refer to my notes.

    I have gotten more done on the front suspension tonight but I am not happy. I have issues and need to think about it more. These new lightweight platforms are giving me grief but there will be a good solution after some sleep.

    The great news is that I have devised a way to accurately measure camber as the front suspension is being re-made. Your tack welds will be in good places.

    Photos and a better update will be posted at the end of the weekend.

    Regards,
    Jason.

  11. #11
    Swampy Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by raised by monkeys View Post
    I like the rocker cover. You sure drink alot of formula swampy, lol
    The only benefit of kids is the spare bolt tins!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Wellington, New Zealand
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    Kris, I have not talked to the engine builder yet but we had a power cut at work today so got sent home very early. I have just dummy assembled one side of the new front suspension and MAN an I excited. I love it when a plan comes together

    Anyway, the problem on the old front end was insufficient adjustment, weak swaybar mounts and the whole thing could have been lighter. The excitement is that with the new camber plates the car seems to have -3.2 degrees camber at rest and then as the suspension compresses it rises to -3.6 degrees - all on the factory lower control arm!

    You can reduce the negative camber using the camber plates but the -3.2 degrees is getting very close to the -3.5 degrees I wanted. With a re-drill of the crossmember to bring the inner lower control arm out a smidge I am confident that you will see a maximum in excess of -3.5 degrees (probably more like -4.5 degrees). The fact that negative camber increases under compression is the bit I am most excited about.

    I am seriously stoked. I wanted to build the front end to gain negative camber on compression and it looks like it works - even without adjustable lower control arms or camber blocks between the bottom of the strut and the balljoint.

    There is still work to be done in Townsville to locate the swaybar better, but that is a relatively trivial and simple job.

    Now I need to sort out the issues from the previous night due to too little clearance between the threaded tube for the adjustable platforms and the strut tube - but I will take that to an engineer on Monday to see what can be done now that I have been able to mark where the threaded tube should be mounted.

    Yeehaa!
    Last edited by UncleJake; 22nd April 2010 at 06:29 PM.

  13. #13
    Swampy Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by UncleJake View Post
    That's the stuff Swampy!

    Have you driven in a cast sleeve or did you build it up with weld?

    I assume there is more clearance for the head studs/bolts than is apparent in the photo
    The sleeves are pressed in mild steel ( I hear what you were saying about the heat contraction issue, but hopefuly will be ok as it is a very heavy press fit)
    There is one the same that has been running around for a while with no issues.
    We had the manifolds cast from some originals. Yes there is room for head studs.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Wellington, New Zealand
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    Good progress again this weekend. The dash is now mounted and I have found heaps of bits and pieces I forgot I had purchased.

    The glazing is half back in but it is all pretty scratched up and split as expected. The best news is that I found the glazing for the two doors so that can go on the car once it is a little more assembled.

    The sway bar is temporarily back on and the struts are off to an engineer tomorrow to get the threaded tubes pressed on an welded into place. I hope they can do that quickly so we can get cracking on setting up the springs etc. to allow the car to get back on the ground and outside for a wash.

    After that there is about a trillion things to re-fit before she heads off to the painters.

    That will give me a break to sort out boxing up and labeling all the stuff that will go with the car as only I know what each bit does.

  15. #15
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    More progress tonight. I really should take the camera I guess.

    One door on a glazing installed to that door.

    All the boxes and boxes of spare bits removed from the shelves and sorted. The good bits labeled where required (some stuff is obvious) and boxed up to go inside the car when it gets onto the trailer.

    The front struts and threaded tubes were delivered to the engineers this morning to have the tubes pressed and welded on. I hope they can do it. The tolerances are very fine.

    At this rate I will be ready before the engine builder does his final 60 hours. I will phone him again on Wednesday.

    The frustration tonight was trying to locate the immediately previous logbook and trailer rego papers. The trailer rego demands are not something I normally keep and it is registered until August so I will have to try the LTSA for that bit of ownership proof but I can only find the Car's logbook that started in 1989 (before I bought the car) and the current logbook which is new as I have not raced the car for several years. The missing logbook is full and that is the one that has my name and address in it.

    I will keep searching tomorrow night. Grrrr. Where did I put it!?!

  16. #16
    Tonnes of work going on there Jason, bet its starting to look real good.
    Last edited by raised by monkeys; 26th April 2010 at 09:59 PM.

  17. #17
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    Thanks for the encouraging words mate. TBH it is starting to look like a car again but is so dusty I am desperate to get her down on the ground, outside and washed.

    The sign writer is booked. I am only still to confirm the painter

  18. #18
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    middle northern Melbourne
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    Updates over weekend?
    www.cortina-mk1.com
    Contact me for parts.

  19. #19
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    A little progress Al. Photos soon. Just got home

  20. #20
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    So, I have the load bearing plates for the new strut tops welded in and then made some ears for the strut brace that are over 100 grams lighter that the old ones. All ready to prime but heck it is cold here (8 degrees)

    Picture 454..jpg



    And I cleaned down the engine bay with Prepsol. It looks better

    Picture 453..jpg



    Then re-fitted the sway bar and lower control arms into the factory positions. Kris will need to move both to get the best out of the car but that can be done in Townsville

    Picture 459..jpg



    My race mate Aidan was supposed to finish assembly of the rear brakes on Sunday but he has failed to meet the deadline so they look like this

    Picture 458..jpg



    But the happy news is that the struts are ready to re-fit now and they have come out well

    Picture 457..jpg



    Last weekend I got the dash bolted in along with some other bits. I don't want to fit the seat and roll cage intrusion beams until I get the car outside to wash it.

    Picture 465..jpg


    A trailer covered in spare parts, good bits and documentaion. All of which needs to fit inside the care somehow without scratching anything

    Picture 461..jpg


    And a test fit of the bonnet again with the screen and most of the glazing in place.

    Picture 467..jpg



    Repairs from a heavy tyre rub are yet to be completed. The door isn't properly closed by the way.

    Picture 455..jpg
    Last edited by UncleJake; 4th May 2010 at 10:52 PM.

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